logo

Consultancy to develop programme guidance to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children, UNICEF Child Protection

New York, NY

Company Description

UNICEF is the driving force that helps build a world where the rights of every child are realized. We have the global authority to influence decision-makers, and the variety of partners at grassroots level to turn the most innovative ideas into reality.  That makes us unique among world organizations, and unique among those working with the young.

 

We believe that nurturing and caring for children are the cornerstones of human progress.  UNICEF was created with this purpose in mind – to work with others to overcome the obstacles that poverty, violence, disease and discrimination place in a child’s path.  We believe that we can, together, advance the cause of humanity.

 

We advocate for measures to give children the best start in life, because proper care at the youngest age forms the strongest foundation for a person’s future.

 

We promote girls’ education – ensuring that they complete primary education as a minimum – because it benefits all children, both girls and boys. Girls who are educated grow up to become better thinkers, better citizens, and better parents to their own children.

 

We act so that all children are immunized against common childhood diseases, and are well nourished, because it is wrong for a child to suffer or die from a preventable illness.

 

We work to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among young people because it is right to keep them from harm and enable them to protect others. We help children and families affected by HIV/AIDS to live their lives with dignity.

 

We involve everyone in creating protective environments for children. We are present to relieve suffering during emergencies, and wherever children are threatened, because no child should be exposed to violence, abuse or exploitation.

 

UNICEF upholds the Convention on the Rights of the Child.  We work to assure equality for those who are discriminated against, girls and women in particular. We work for the Millennium Development Goals and for the progress promised in the United Nations Charter. We strive for peace and security. We work to hold everyone accountable to the promises made for children.

 

We are part of the Global Movement for Children – a broad coalition dedicated to improving the life of every child.  Through this movement, and events such as the United Nations Special Session on Children, we encourage young people to speak out and participate in the decisions that affect their lives. 

 

We are active in more than 190 countries and territories through country programmes and National Committees. We are UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund.

Job Description

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

Consultancy to develop programme guidance to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children, UNICEF Child Protection

 

 

Background

 

Over the past decades the international community has made important advances in the strengthening of the protection of children from sexual exploitation and abuse,[1] both in development and emergency contexts. Progress has been made towards the universal ratification and implementation of key human rights treaties and political commitments such as the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), its Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography (OPSC), the commitments made at the three World Congresses against Sexual Exploitation of Children (Stockholm 1996, Yokohama 2001, Rio de Janeiro 2008) and the UN Security Council Resolutions 1820, 1882, 1888, 1889 and 1960 addressing sexual violence in conflict.

 

As a result of more specific attention to sexual violence in development and emergency contexts, governments across all regions are recognizing the problem and taking measures to address it. For example, an increasing number of countries are harmonizing legislation with international standards, criminalizing all forms of sexual abuse and exploitation of children. Many countries are also implementing action plans addressing sexual exploitation and abuse of children. The capacities of national and local level authorities to implement legislation and policies are improving. More and more countries are investing in comprehensive support services for children who have experienced these forms of abuse and exploitation, ensuring a multi-sectorial approach involving health, social welfare, justice and education sectors. Governments and civil society are also taking action to prevent that abuse and exploitation happen in the first place. Actions include awareness raising and capacity building at local level to help children, parents, teachers, community leaders (including civil society and faith-based organizations), media and the private sector, to break the silence around practices that harm children and women.

 

Increasingly, gender-based violence (GBV), including sexual violence against children and women, is also addressed as a key aspect of humanitarian and emergency response.  Emergency-related gender-based violence against women and children, girls especially, has been recognized as a serious global health, human rights, and development issue during the last 20 years. The publication of the IASC Guidelines for Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings (2005) was a significant marker of progress and improved the understanding on the role that each sector must play to prevent GBV and to provide appropriate assistance to children. The establishment in 2008 of the Gender-Based Violence Area of Responsibility Working Group (GBV AoR) provided the first-ever opportunity for UN agencies and implementing partners to join together in a concerted, coordinated and strategic way to support and improve field-based efforts to prevent and respond to GBV. While much remains to be done, the institutionalization of the GBV AoR at the global and field levels has contributed to an unprecedented momentum—and a structure for harnessing that momentum—to combat GBV against women and girls in emergencies. 

 

UNICEF’s and partners’ work at national, regional and global level has been instrumental to this progress. The protection of children from sexual abuse and sexual exploitation is part of UNICEF’s core mandate, and its commitment to support Member States in their efforts to implement above-mentioned international standards and commitments. A review of UNICEF Country Office Annual Reports from 2011 shows that at least 70 country offices across all regions supported government and civil society efforts to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children and women, in and out of emergency, in accordance with the international standards and commitments. They focus on the two inter-related pillars of the UNICEF Child Protection Strategy (2008), i.e. strengthening of child protection systems (legislation, policies and comprehensive services for children) and supporting social change to address attitudes, social norms and practices that harm children. This approach applies in development and emergency contexts. Country offices are increasingly advocating for a comprehensive, multi-sectorial approach focusing on both prevention and response. The programmatic approach employed depends on the nature and scope of the issue; efforts undertaken so far by the governments, civil society and international organizations; socio-economic, institutional and cultural context; development and emergency contexts; and available human and financial resources.

 

Due to UNICEF’s long history of supporting Member States and partner efforts to protect children from sexual exploitation and abuse/sexual violence, UNICEF has identified the need to develop a consolidated, global guidance document outlining key strategies that have shown evidence of effectiveness. UNICEF country offices and partners are increasingly requesting such guidance in part because of efforts to ensure follow up to the recommendations of the Secretary-General’s Study on Violence against Children (2006), and reinforced efforts to implement international standards and political commitments. In part it stems from countries which have recently undertaken studies on violence against children such as within the Together for Girls Initiative,[2] and that are now designing and implementing a multi-sectorial policy and programme response to address to the findings of the studies. In the last ten to fifteen years, UNICEF has increasingly acknowledged the links between addressing GBV in emergencies and its ability to achieve its core commitments. Humanitarian assistance is the first step in responding to a major crisis, but how a country rebuilds itself afterwards is equally important.  This is particularly important for the issue of sexual violence. Global guidance is needed to support systems development and social change required to address sexual violence in emergencies and transitions, including integrating emergency preparedness and response planning into national planning mechanisms and processes. Emergency response is that much easier when appropriate systems are built in times of stability.

 

UNICEF seeks a consultant to draft a global guidance document for effective strategies to prevent and protect children from sexual exploitation and abuse. The guidance will reflect the UNICEF Child Protection Strategy, spanning across the interrelated pillars of systems strengthening and social change to address practices and social norms harmful to children, addressing development and emergency contexts. It will draw upon: 1) a review of the latest research in the field, identifying critical dimensions and trends; 2) a review of key learning’s and recommendations in relation to efforts of the international community to implement relevant human rights standards and political commitments; and 3) a review of policy and programme strategies proven to be effective.  It will also draw upon research and guidance developed in related fields such as violence prevention and response, gender-based violence in and out of emergency, and violence against women.

 

The guidance aims to support the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies and programmes at the country, regional and global levels and serve as a contribution to the development of broader guidance on how to effectively address different forms of violence against children. It will also serve as a contribution to a global consultation planned for early 2013 to review and discuss progress made, lessons learned and effective evidenced based programme responses to violence against children.  In addition, the development of this guidance contributes to, and will be done in coordination with, the development of UNICEF’s operational guidance on the prevention of and response to GBV in emergencies (under development).

 

Purpose and key objectives

 

To develop a global guidance document for UNICEF country, regional and headquarters offices and partners on effective strategies for the protection of children from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse/sexual violence, in development and emergency contexts The guidance will consolidate latest research on critical dimensions and trends, as well as key learning’s and recommendations of efforts to date to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children. It should outline key principles and comprehensive strategies for an effective policy and programme response at country, regional and global levels focusing on both prevention and response, within a broader framework of addressing violence against children. A select number of promising practices will be included, highlighting the key strategies and resources for an effective programme response.  successful implementation. ?.

 

Duration

 

The estimated duration of the consultancy is 75 working days, within the period 24 September 2012 to 31 March 2013.

 

Major Tasks, Expected outputs/deliverables and timeframe

 

A package of guidance documents for UNICEF country, regional and headquarters offices and partners on key principles and effective strategies for the protection of children from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse/sexual violence, in development and emergency contexts. The package will be submitted in English and be comprised of:

  • ·         A global guidance document on key principles and comprehensive strategies for an effective policy and programme response to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children/sexual violence, in development and emergency contexts.
  • ·         An executive summary synthesizing key findings and recommendations.
  • ·         An academic literature review analyzing critical dimensions and observed trends in latest research on the topic, and key learning’s and recommendations of efforts to date to protect children from sexual exploitation and abuse /sexual violence, in development and emergency contexts.

 

 

Tasks and Outputs/deliverables.    Estimated number of working days

1.      Inception report, which includes scope, methodology, work plan/timeline, and draft outline for desk reviews and programme guidance. A draft outline of the programme guidance, and a draft annotated bibliography will be shared with the consultant, who is expected to review, complement and finalize it based on a review of the draft annotated bibliography and consultation with UNICEF staff and partners working in the field of sexual violence prevention and response. (No more than 5 pages). 3 days

 

2.      First draft of desk review identifying critical dimensions, trends, key learning’s and recommendations on efforts to date.  This will include a review of key resources and academic literature to identify and analyze critical dimensions and observed trends in research on sexual exploitation and abuse of children, as well as key learning’s and recommendations of efforts of the international community to prevent and protect children from these forms of exploitation and abuse, in development and emergency contexts. A draft annotated bibliography on key resources will be shared with the consultant. The consultant is expected to review, complement and finalize it, and undertake a desk review by gathering additional information through literature review and consultations with UNICEF staff and partners. (An estimated 20-30 pages, single spaced 12 pt). 15 days

 

3.      Second draft of desk review identifying critical dimensions, trends, key learning’s and recommendations on efforts to date. 5 days

 

4.      First draft of desk review of programme guidance/ recommendations.  This will include a review of existing UNICEF and partner guidance documents on effective approaches to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children, in development and emergency contexts. A draft annotated bibliography on select programme guidance will be shared with the consultant. The consultant is expected to review, complement and finalize the annotated bibliography, and undertake a desk review of existing guidance documents by gathering additional information through literature review and consultations with UNICEF staff and partners. (An estimated 10-20 pages, single space 12pt).  13 days

 

5.      Second draft of desk review of programme guidance/ recommendations. 3 days

 

6.     A draft document which reviews promising programme experiences to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children/sexual violence, implemented by UNICEF and partners, with recommendations for additional experiences to be considered. A draft mapping of promising experiences will be shared with the consultant. The consultant is expected to review and recommend additional experiences as necessary, based on literature review and consultations with partners and UNICEF staff. To the extent possible the examples of promising experiences on ‘what works’ should be evaluated and evidenced based. (An estimated 5-10 pages, single space 12pt). 4 days

 

7.      Adjusted outline for final policy and programme guidance/recommendations. 1 day

 

8.      First draft of policy and programme guidance/recommendations.  The preparation of this guidance document on effective strategies to address sexual exploitation and abuse of children/sexual violence, will also include consolidating key findings of the desk reviews (task 2 and 4 above), outlining key principles and comprehensive strategies for an effective policy and programme response, focusing both on prevention and response, within a broader framework of addressing violence against children. The guidance will focus on development and emergency contexts and it will complement UNICEF’s operational guidance on the prevention of and response to GBV in emergencies (under development).  A select number of promising practices will be included, highlighting the key strategies. (no more than 50 pages, single space 12pt). 15 days

 

9.      First draft of executive summary synthesizing key findings and recommendations.  A synthesized executive summary will be prepared as a stand-alone document accompanying the guidance, summarizing key findings and recommendations. (an estimated 8-10 pages, single space 12pt). 3 days

 

10.  Second draft of policy and programme guidance/recommendations and executive summary, incorporating feedback from UNICEF and partners on the various documents and outputs. UNICEF Headquarters will share the draft documents with colleagues and partners at headquarters, regional and country level, for feedback and comments.  5 days

 

11.  Final draft of policy and programme guidance/recommendations and executive summary, incorporating feedback from UNICEF and partners. 3 days

 

12.  Presentation of findings, principles and programme guidance delivered to UNICEF staff and partners.  A draft power point presentation of the key findings, principles and recommendations will be prepared by the consultant and presented to UNICEF staff and partners through webinars and other appropriate fora (to be determined). 5 days

 

Location and expected travel

 

The consultancy will be home-based. The consultancy may require travel during assignment.

[1] These Terms of Reference uses the terminology ‘sexual exploitation and abuse’ interchangeably with ‘sexual violence’. While international human rights standards refer to ’sexual exploitation’ and ‘sexual abuse’ of children, there is no internationally agreed and legally binding definition of sexual violence against children.

[2] Swaziland, Tanzania, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Haiti, Malawi and the Philippines.          

Qualifications

Key skills, technical back ground and experience required

 

  • ·         Advanced university degree in social sciences or related fields.
  • ·         A senior consultant with a minimum of ten to fifteen years relevant professional work experience at national and international levels in development field, with a focus on women and children’s rights and violence prevention and response, in particular sexual violence and other forms of gender-based violence.
  • ·         Proven research skills and demonstrated expertise in analysis and development of technical papers and reports as well as programmatic guidance related to violence against women and children, in particular sexual violence, gender and child protection. Published work an asset.
  • ·         Operational experience at country/regional level in the implementation of programming related to violence against women and children, sexual violence, gender, and child protection.
  • ·         Good understanding of child protection systems and changing social norms, attitudes and practices harmful to children and women.
  • ·         Knowledge and experience in working in emergencies, especially on the issue of GBV, especially sexual violence.
  • ·         Knowledge and experience of UNICEF policies and programmes of cooperation, including on child protection, a plus. Prior experience working with the UN/UNICEF an asset.
  • ·         Capacity to work independently yet with ability to share information, receive feedback and engage in dialogue with partners.
  • ·         Excellent analytical, communication, writing and editorial skills in English language. Working knowledge in another UN language an asset.

 

The following conditions of service apply to all individual consultants:

1. LEGAL STATUS

Individuals engaged under a consultant contract serve in a personal capacity and not as representatives of a Government or of any other authority external to the United Nations.  They are neither “staff members” under the Staff Regulations of the United Nations and UNICEF policies and procedures nor “officials” for the purpose of the Convention of 13 February 1946 on the privileges and immunities of the United Nations.  Consultants may, however, be given the status of “experts on mission” in the sense of Section 22 of Article VI of the Convention.  If they are required to travel on behalf of the United Nations, they may be given a United Nations certification in accordance with Section 26 of Article VII of the Convention.

2. OBLIGATIONS

Consultants shall have the duty to respect the impartiality and independence of the United Nations and shall neither seek nor accept instructions regarding the services to be performed for UNICEF from any Government or from any authority external to the United Nations.  During their period of service for UNICEF, consultants shall refrain from any conduct that would adversely reflect on the United Nations or UNICEF and shall not engage in any activity that is incompatible with the discharge of their duties with the Organization.  Consultants are required to exercise the utmost discretion in all matters of official business of the Organization.  In particular, but without limiting the foregoing, consultants are expected to conduct themselves in a manner consistent with the Standards of Conduct in the International Civil Service.  Consultants are to comply with the UNICEF Standards of Electronic Conduct and the requirements set forth in the Secretary General’s Bulletin on Special Measures for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse, both of which are incorporated  by reference into the contract between the consultants and UNICEF.  Unless otherwise authorized by the appropriate official in the office concerned, consultants shall not communicate at any time to the media or to any institution, person, Government or other authority external to UNICEF any information that has not been made public and which has become known to them by reason of their association with the United Nations.  The consultant may not use such information without the written authorization of UNICEF.  Nor shall the consultant use such information for private advantage.  These obligations do not lapse upon cessation of service with UNICEF.

3. TITLE RIGHTS

UNICEF shall be entitled to all property rights, including but not limited to patents, copyrights and trademarks, with regard to material which bears a direct relation to, or is made in consequence of, the services provided to the Organization by the consultant.  At the request of UNICEF, the consultant shall assist in securing such property rights and transferring them to the Organization in compliance with the requirements of the applicable law.

4. TRAVEL

If consultants are required by UNICEF to travel beyond commuting distance from their usual place of residence, such travel at the expense of UNICEF shall be governed by conditions equivalent to the relevant provisions of the 100 series of the United Nations Staff Rules (Chapter VII) and relevant UNICEF policies and procedures.  Travel by air by the most direct and economical route is the normal mode for travel at the expense of UNICEF.  Such travel will be by business class if the journey is nine hours or longer, and by economy class if the journey is less than nine hours, and first class by rail.

5. MEDICAL CLEARANCE

Consultants expected to work in any office of the Organization shall be required to submit a statement of good health prior to commencement of work and to take full responsibility for the accuracy of that statement, including confirmation that they have been fully informed regarding inoculations required for the country or countries to which travel is authorized.

6. INSURANCE

Consultants are fully responsible for arranging, at their own expense, such life, health and other forms of insurance covering the period of their services on behalf of UNICEF as they consider appropriate.  Consultants are not eligible to participate in the life or health insurance schemes available to United Nations staff members.  The responsibility of the United Nations and UNICEF is limited solely to the payment of compensation under the conditions described in paragraph 7 below.

7. SERVICE INCURRED DEATH, INJURY OR ILLNESS

Consultants who are authorized to travel at UNICEF’s expense or who are required under the contract to perform their services in a United Nations or UNICEF office, or their dependants as appropriate, shall be entitled in the event of death, injury or illness attributable to the performance of services on behalf of UNICEF while in travel status or while working in an office of the Organization on official UNICEF business to compensation equivalent to the compensation which, under Appendix D to the United Nations Staff Rules (ST/SGB/Staff Rules/Appendix D/Rev.1 and Amend.1), would be payable to a staff member at step V of the First Officer (P-4) level of the Professional category.

8. ARBITRATION

Any dispute arising out of or, in connexion with, this contract shall, if attempts at settlement by negotiation have failed, be submitted to arbitration in New York by a single arbitrator agreed to by both parties.  Should the parties be unable to agree on a single arbitrator within thirty days of the request for arbitration, then each party shall proceed to appoint one arbitrator and the two arbitrators thus appointed shall agree on a third.  Failing such agreement, either party may request the appointment of the third arbitrator by the President of the United Nations Administrative Tribunal.  The decision rendered in the arbitration shall constitute final adjudication of the dispute.

9. TERMINATION OF CONTRACT

This contract may be terminated by either party before the expiry date of the contract by giving notice in writing to the other party.  The period of notice shall be five days in the case of contracts for a total period of less than two months and fourteen days in the case of contracts for a longer period; provided however that in the event of termination on the grounds of misconduct by the consultant, UNICEF shall be entitled to terminate the contract without notice.

In the event of the contract being terminated prior to its due expiry date in this way, the consultant shall be compensated on a  pro rata basis for no more than the actual amount of work performed to the satisfaction of UNICEF.  Additional costs incurred by the United Nations resulting from the termination of the contract by the consultant may be withheld from any amount otherwise due to the consultant from UNICEF.

10. TAXATION

The United Nations and UNICEF undertake no liability for taxes, duty or other contribution payable by the consultant on payments made under this contract.  No statement of earnings will be issued by the United Nations or UNICEF to the consultant.

 

Additional Information


Qualified applicants are requested to apply by September 05, 2012 and submit a cover letter, Sample of any written report, CV, and signed P11 form (which can be downloaded from our website at http://www.unicef.org/about/employ/index_53129.html). Applications without a daily rate will not be considered.

All your information will be kept confidential according to EEO guidelines.